Carbyne : The Strongest Element On Earth!

0
226
Stronger-Carbyne-3-610x270

You all must be quite familiar with the nano-technology that is nowadays emerging as the ‘future technology’ of the world. The continuous improvements in this field have finally led us to Carbyne which is estimated to be the strongest element found over our earth.

Each material has its own unique properties and with the quest for such uniqueness, scientists and engineers have struggled to find their way to Carbyne. If we see at the molecular level, then carbyne is simply a chain of carbon atoms held together by either double or alternating single and triple covalent bonds between them. Such a straightforward structure makes carbine 200 times stronger than steel.

You must have heard of ‘Graphene’. So far, it has been the champion among nano-materials. But with the innovation of carbyne, graphene loses that remark. It has been found that carbyne has twice the tensile strength when compared to that of graphene.

Stronger-Carbyne-3-610x270

Stronger-Carbyne-610x343

“You could look at it as an ultimately thin Graphene ribbon, reduced to just one atom, or an ultimately thin nanotube. It could be useful for nanomechanical systems, in spintronic devices, as sensors, as strong and light materials for mechanical applications or for energy storage,” says Mr. Boris Yakobson, Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Rice.

Mass production of the material is still under process. Scientists are consistently looking forward to a technique that would allow mass production of carbyne. Earlier attempts have successfully synthesized the material at room temperature but that have been constricted to a limited production.

So, if the breakthrough occurs, it’s going to have a significant impact on the way various industries around the world function these days. It paves the way for new innovations to take place.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.